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Frame by Frame

The Pre-Digital Era

I went camping throughout the United States in the early 1960s, and I remember drifting through one sleepy town after another, usually in the morning or in the late afternoon. The local movie theater would be a hub of activity as the sun set, and people from all over town would gather to see the latest double bills — entire families, not just young adults — as television had only recently been introduced. The movie theater from the 1920s through the 1960s was often a central social gathering place for the residents of many towns — that’s gone today, and everyone is online, at home. Some of the old theaters remain, but the sense of community is gone.

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About the Author

Wheeler Winston Dixon

Wheeler Winston Dixon, Ryan Professor of Film Studies at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, is an internationally recognized scholar and writer of film history, theory and criticism. He is the author of numerous books and more than 70 articles on film and appears regularly in national media outlets discussing film and culture trends. Frame by Frame is a collection of his thoughts on a number of those topics. To contact Prof. Dixon for an interview, reach him at 402.472.6064 or wdixon1@unl.edu.

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