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Posts Tagged ‘3-D Films’

Man in the Dark – The First Major Studio 3-D Movie

Sunday, July 9th, 2017

Man in the Dark – not House of Wax – was the first major studio 3-D movie.

The more you know, the more you know how conventional “history” is often wrong. Warner Bros. produced House of Wax, directed by André De Toth in 1953, and touted it as the first major studio 3-D movie – and it’s an excellent thriller, shot in lush color, with Vincent Price in the leading role, devouring the scenery as usual with his customary professionalism.

But House of Wax was not the first major studio 3-D release. That distinction – sort of like a cinematic horse race – belongs to Lew LandersMan in the Dark, starring Edmond O’Brien, seen above in the trailer for the film, which wisely doesn’t show a single scene from the film in question. Instead, O’Brien admonishes the audience that “you’re not allowed in there” and that the film “of necessity, had to be filmed behind closed doors.”

Landers was a prolific but undistinguished director, who director Budd Boetticher referred to as “a no-talent guy. They called him the ‘D’ director there at Columbia; he just wasn’t any good. Whenever they had a picture they didn’t really care about, they’d give it to Landers.”

Well, that’s probably true, although he directed some good films when left to his own devices, such as Bela Lugosi’s last turn as Count Dracula (in all but name) in 1943’s Return of the Vampire, and much earlier Universal’s surprisingly sadistic horror film The Raven (1935, as Louis Friedlander, his real name).

But on Man in the Dark, Landers was ordered by Columbia studio boss Harry Cohn to crank out the finished film in 11 days flat – an astonishing speed for any film, much less one in 3-D – to beat House of Wax into theaters by two days – a slim margin, but nevertheless, a first for a major studio.

So how is the film? Actually, it’s not bad, with a really bizarre plot, as aptly summarized by critic Glenn Erickson: “convicted criminal Steve Rawley (Edmond O’Brien) volunteers for [experimental brain surgery designed to ‘cure’ his criminal tendencies – in the original script, specifically described as a lobotomy] half-assuming that he’ll not survive. He awakes with total amnesia and a more cheerful personality, and under a new name, ‘Blake’ actually looks forward to beginning life afresh tending the hospital’s hedges.

Steve is instead kidnapped and beaten bloody by his old cronies in crime Lefty, Arnie and Cookie (Ted de Corsia, Horace McMahon & Nick Dennis), who want to know where Steve hid the loot from their last robbery. Steve remembers nothing, and kisses from his old girlfriend Peg Benedict (Audrey Totter) fail to extract the location of the $130,000. But weird dreams provide clues that might lead Steve and Peg to the money everyone is so desperate to possess.”

Shot by the gifted cinematographer Floyd Crosby using a modified version of the Natural Vision system, involving two “slaved” cameras in frame-for-frame synchronization in one blimp to muffle the sound of the camera motor – a rather unwieldy system at best – the film could have been much better than it is. As critic Gary W. Tooze pointed out, “Man in the Dark has a pretty good concept going for it – although, perhaps, not dynamically realized or protected with the dialogue. I could see a strong director taking a hold of this project and really making the most of it.”

Nevertheless, it’s still an interesting project, now available on 3-D DVD. It’s certainly worth your time to check it out, and if it was shot under drastic time and budget constraints, it’s still a genuine cultural artifact. Critic Elliot Stein described the film in The Village Voice as “a rescued gem” and added that Man in the Dark “seems to be the 3-D [film] that most exploits the short-lived medium. An endless array of stuff comes whiffling at your face—a lit cigar, a repulsive spider, scissors, forceps, fists, falling bodies, and a roller coaster. The prolific Landers may not have been a great director, but he was a pretty good pitcher.”

You can see it now on DVD in full 3-D; a genuinely intriguing part of cinema history.

William Cameron Menzies’ The Maze (1953)

Sunday, September 21st, 2014

William Cameron Menzies’ The Maze (1953) has to be seen – in 3D – to be believed.

With everyone talking about The Maze Runner, a pallid rehash of Lord of The Flies, I thought I would highlight this little-seen gem from 1953, which is the subject of a thoughtful essay by Jeff Kuykendall, which begins by noting that “if you’ve ever seen the Douglas Fairbanks version of The Thief of Bagdad (1924), then you love and respect William Cameron Menzies. In the 1920′s Menzies quickly established himself as a first-rate art director, and the Fairbanks vehicle was enlivened considerably by Menzies’ sets, which resembled the exaggerated illustrations of a child’s Arabian Nights storybook, while Fairbanks hopped, skipped, and swashbuckled through every inch of them.

In 1929 Menzies won the first Oscar ever awarded for art direction (for The Dove and The Tempest), and he quickly graduated to directing his own films, his first solo directing effort being the visually stunning (if dramatically lacking) H.G. Wells adaptation Things to Come (1936). David O. Selznick put him in charge of Gone with the Wind‘s art direction, for which he won another Oscar, but in the subsequent decades Menzies never quite established himself as a director of note. His best-regarded film is Invaders from Mars (1953), a dream-like, dread-filled science fiction yarn tailored for the Cold War. Less remembered is the film’s companion-piece, 1953′s The Maze. Shot in 3-D, it’s even more surreal than Invaders.”

Check out the trailer for the film here, and the rest of Jeff Kuykendall’s essay here, with a number of excellent frame grabs; like Kuykendall, I, too, am a Menzies fan (as who isn’t, I might ask?) and when watching The Maze Runner, I kept wondering what Menzies would have done with the material from a visual standpoint, especially given CGI and green screen capabilities which he, of course, didn’t have the advantage of using back in the 20s through the 50s. But I’m sure he would have jumped at the chance to design The Maze Runner; in the meantime, check out this moody Gothic from Menzies, and see what you think.

The Maze is a completely bizarre and deeply original film; well worth watching.

3-D Festival at the Egyptian Theatre, Los Angeles

Thursday, May 23rd, 2013

The largest festival of 3-D films in the world is coming to Los Angeles; click here, or on the image above, for more information.

As the press release for the event notes, “the World 3-D Film Expo will return to the Egyptian Theatre, September 6-15, 2013. The ten-day festival will pay tribute to the 60th anniversary of what many film historians regard as the ‘Golden Age’ of 3-D, and will include screenings of the John Wayne western Hondo, the Vincent Price horror film House of Wax, Cole Porter’s musical Kiss Me Kate, the sci-fi thriller It Came From Outer Space, and later 3-D films, such as 1983’s Jaws 3-D. Lesser-known titles, such as The French Line with Jane Russell and Second Chance with Robert Mitchum, will also be included.

The Expo is partnering with digital 3-D projection sponsor RealD to present a number of screenings in RealD 3-D including Alfred Hitchcock’s Dial M for Murder and Jack Arnold’s sci-fi/horror classic Creature from the Black Lagoon. Stefan Droessler, 3-D historian and head of the Munich Film Museum, will present an in-depth overview of ‘European 3-D Filmmaking 1935-1953,’ including long-lost footage from the 1936 Berlin Olympics.

The festival will also be home to several premieres including the Los Angeles Premiere of the 1946 Russian 3-D adaptation of Robinson Crusoe. September 14th will mark the World Premiere of the stereoscopic version of the 1954 Korean War drama, Dragonfly Squadron. The film was only released in a flat version during its initial release, and has never been seen by audiences in 3-D. Newly-restored 35 mm prints of shorts ‘Rocky Marciano, Champion vs. Jersey Joe Walcott, Challenger’ and ‘College Capers’ will be screened in 3-D for the first time in 60 years. Most programs being presented at the festival will be shown in archival double-system 35 mm. prints, many of them the last known copies.”

The 3-D footage of the 1936 Berlin Olympics is a real find; if you’re going to be in Los Angeles, go!

About the Author

Headshot of Wheeler Winston Dixon Wheeler Winston Dixon, Ryan Professor of Film Studies at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, is an internationally recognized scholar and writer of film history, theory and criticism. He is the author of thirty books and more than 100 articles on film, and appears regularly in national media outlets discussing film and culture trends. Frame by Frame is a collection of his thoughts on a number of those topics. All comments by Dixon on this blog are his own opinions.

In The National News

Wheeler Winston Dixon has been quoted by Fast Company, The New Yorker, The New York Times, the BBC, CNN, The Christian Science Monitor, US News and World Report, The Boston Globe, Entertainment Weekly, The Los Angeles Times, NPR, The PBS Newshour, USA Today and other national media outlets on digital cinema, film and related topics - see the UNL newsroom at http://news.unl.edu/news-releases/1/ for more details.

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