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Posts Tagged ‘Bill Domonkos’

Vimeo vs. Theatrical or, The 21st Century Cinematheque

Tuesday, October 18th, 2016

Vimeo is the 21st century version of the experimental cinematheques of the 1960s.

I’m old enough to remember the countless theatrical screenings I’ve attended in my life, both of mainstream and experimental films, and there’s still – after all these years – no substitute for seeing a film in a theater, properly projected on a big screen. But times change, and we change with them. Theatrical repertory houses have all but died off, projection on 35mm film is now a boutique item – sort of like watching an opera live – and the cost of making films in traditional media has skyrocketed.

I’ve had many screenings of my films over the years at museums and galleries, and I’m deeply grateful for the experience of having a live audience – there’s nothing like it – but we have to realize that much of this resides in the past. The future is online, and as David Bowie observed way back in 2002 with typical prescience, the world is going to streaming as the preferred form of access for books, movies and music, adding that “it’s terribly exciting. But on the other hand it doesn’t matter if you think it’s exciting or not; it’s what’s going to happen.”

So although I have two video shows coming up in New York, which I’m very excited about – at the SLA 307 Gallery and The Amos Eno Gallery, offering the chance to interact with a live audience – in many ways, the audience on Vimeo is just as real, and the videos are seen by a vastly larger number of viewers. Just yesterday, I received an invitation to participate in group exhibition in Bologna, Italy – by using Vimeo as part of a group installation – that I never would have had the chance to appear in, were it not for the global reach of Vimeo on the web.

YouTube has a much wider audience, of course, but the quality of the image, and the control that one has over the video files that one uploads, is vastly inferior to the degree of artistic and viewer control that one has on Vimeo. It’s the first high-definition video upload site, and although there is more and more that’s commercial on the site, by and large it’s a place for artists, which is as it should be. It gives all video and filmmakers a chance to reach out to the entire world. Thanks to Bill Domonkos for the gif above; he’s a superb artist, whom I met through Vimeo; much appreciated.

The image above is from my video Real & Unreal: click here, or on the image above, to access my Vimeo site.

Bill Domonkos and The Archive of Dreams

Thursday, July 14th, 2016

A still from Domonkos’ Beyond The Blue Horizonclick here, or on the image above, to view this short video.

The video work of Bill Domonkos is at once mysterious and sublime, mixing 1940s and 50s pop culture with 21st century surrealism. As Michael Hardy notes in The Boston Globe, “Spooky. Hypnotic. Lush. Witty. Sublime. The extraordinary films of San Francisco-based artist Bill Domonkos call up a descriptive vocabulary that never seems to capture the fluidity, the aesthetic metamorphoses, of the director’s vision.” That’s a fitting enough description for starters, but what Domonkos does with found footage and editorial techniques is truly remarkable, creating an entirely new world in which the unreal is real, and the most extraordinary images and juxtapositions seem entirely natural.

Of his work, Domonkos himself notes, “I view my work as a collision and recombination of ideas. My process unfolds gradually and spontaneously—using found materials such as archive film footage, photographs, and the internet. I experiment by combining, altering, editing and reassembling using digital technology, special effects and animation to create a new kind of experience. I am interested in the poetics of time and space—to renew and transform materials, experiences and ideas. The extraordinary thing about cinema is its ability to suggest the ineffable—it is this elusive, dreamlike quality that informs my work.”

A regular figure on the gallery circuit, one can thankfully see a great of Domonkos’ work on Vimeo, by clicking here, although a certain amount of discretion is advised, as some of his work can be quite dark indeed. In general, I favor his lighter, more accessible work, gently playful in some instances, slightly sinister in others. Most of the videos are in the two to three minute range, and his works covers a wide ranges of themes and approaches.

My favorites are such videos as Sisyphus, in which a nondescript executive in a 1950s elevator is suddenly illuminated with a celestial light from above, as a mysterious rock descends through the elevator shaft to cover his face, intercut with an elderly workman clambering up and down the interior of the building, inspecting the elevator’s exterior with a flashlight. There’s no real reason for any of the images here, which is entirely the point; these things just happen in Domonkos’ world, and that’s all there is to it.

Another favorite is Dinah Soar, in which a young woman is first seen putting on makeup with the aid of a rather unusual machine, and then drives a sports car with a distinctly odd gearshift around a race track, only to be pursued by a group of racing car drivers, even as her face, at first possessed of the flawless beauty of a fashion model, gradually changes into a smoking death’s head, while mechanical wind up toys parade across the screen with childish abandon. Again, the precise meaning of these images, as well as the syntactical structure that unites them, is absolutely left up to the viewer; Domonkos creates a world in which anything is possible.

But I think that of all of Domonkos’ work, I’m drawn to those films in which the past and the present gently collide, such as Beyond The Blue Horizon. In this brief video, a 1940s Soundie (a short, pre-MTV music video) by The Three Suns is transformed into a jam session between a human space helmeted organist / vocalist, singing the title song, while two Martian (or alien) sidemen accompany him on guitar and accordion, all of which is being recorded by an unobtrusive sound man in the rear of the shot.

Domonkos’ skill is such that the entire scene seems oddly realistic, even down to the three-second “cigarette burn” cue in the upper right hand corner of the frame as the video comes to an end. All in all, it’s a very unusual world indeed, a recombinant vision that in which the past and present meld together to create a world that is at once accessible, but which operates entirely according to its own lights – a peek into a modern day Twilight Zone of found footage and digital mastery.

Bill Domonkos’ videos are unique, bizarre and deeply surreal – check them on out Vimeo.

About the Author

Headshot of Wheeler Winston Dixon Wheeler Winston Dixon, Ryan Professor of Film Studies at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, is an internationally recognized scholar and writer of film history, theory and criticism. He is the author of thirty books and more than 100 articles on film, and appears regularly in national media outlets discussing film and culture trends. Frame by Frame is a collection of his thoughts on a number of those topics. All comments by Dixon on this blog are his own opinions.

In The National News

Wheeler Winston Dixon has been quoted by Fast Company, The New Yorker, The New York Times, the BBC, CNN, The Christian Science Monitor, US News and World Report, The Boston Globe, Entertainment Weekly, The Los Angeles Times, NPR, The PBS Newshour, USA Today and other national media outlets on digital cinema, film and related topics - see the UNL newsroom at http://news.unl.edu/news-releases/1/ for more details.

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