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Posts Tagged ‘David Lynch’

Uncle John (2015)

Sunday, September 20th, 2015

Steven Piet, John Ashton and Erik Crary on the set of Uncle John.

As the film’s publicity materials succinctly note, “small town bully turned born again Christian, Dutch, has gone missing. Well-regarded member of the community, John, is not a suspect, but has everything to do with it. Dutch’s younger brother, Danny, has his own theory about the disappearance and it centers on John.

Meanwhile, John’s nephew, Ben, arrives in town with his new girlfriend Kate just as John finds himself confronted with threats from Danny.” And that’s just the beginning of one of the most beguiling and mesmeric films in recent memory, made by two young men in sixteen days on an absolutely minimal budget. But as David Lynch noted on his Twitter feed, “check out @UncleJohnMovie – it caught me up and held me for days!”

As Neil Genzlinger noted in a rave review in The New York Times, “the simmering mystery Uncle John is so subtle, so exquisitely paced and so determined not to go in any of the obvious directions that it’s hard to believe the film is Steven Piet’s first feature. Piet, who with Erik Crary also wrote the script, sketches some memorable characters while keeping his two-pronged story sparse, ominous and deliciously ambiguous.

John Ashton is just right as the inscrutable title character, an older fellow in a rural town where an unlikable man named Dutch has gone missing. Shortly before his disappearance, Dutch apparently found Jesus, and he had been visiting various townspeople, confessing to misdeeds and such. Dutch and John’s sister were an item long ago, but something murky happened to the sister, and perhaps now something murky has happened to Dutch.

While all of this is being slowly revealed, many miles away in Chicago a young man named Ben is becoming smitten with a new co-worker, Kate. Alex Moffat and Jenna Lyng are very watchable as this might-become-a-couple, but what do they have to do with the goings-on out in the country? Turns out Ben has a beloved uncle who raised him, a man by the name of John. And when the two young flirters head his way for an impromptu visit, all secrets will be revealed. Or will they? It’s tantalizing, sublimely creepy stuff that keeps you guessing even after the credits roll.”

Added Frank Scheck in The Hollywood Reporter, Uncle John’s “other virtue is reintroducing John Ashton to the screen in his first major role in decades. The character actor, memorable for his sardonic comic turns in Midnight Run and the Beverly Hills Cops movies, delivers an understated but career-defining performance as the title character.

Seen disposing of a body in the film’s opening moments, John is an unassuming widower who looks like he wouldn’t hurt a fly. Whether engaging in small town gossip with his buddies at the coffee shop or politely ignoring the flirtations of one of his carpentry clients, he maintains a low-key demeanor that is only betrayed by the quiet intensity of his gaze . . .

The film is an impressive dual calling card for its tyro director who keeps the tension at a simmering boil throughout both genres. And the late-career performance by the veteran Ashton (sans his usual mustache) is a revelation. The now 67-year-old actor has been steadily employed over the years, but he’s rarely had a role as good as this one and it’s a pleasure to watch him run away with it.”

You can also read an excellent interview with the director and screenwriter in Indiewire, in which Piet and Crary note that “throughout the process, we tried very hard to keep from becoming precious about the whole project. Not that its easy — trying to get a micro-budget film together is all-encompassing because it requires your non-stop attention and a willingness to ask for endless favors.

However, keeping that framed inside the fact that the rest of the world is also doing its own thing was incredibly helpful. Without proper money, way more no’s than yes’s came in. But, by keeping things reasonable and honest, the yes’s we got were for the right reasons.

In terms of production specifically, micro-budget on this one meant there would be no room for indulgence, ego or indecision because it was all going to be over in 16 days anyway. By doing what we could in extensive prep to set that up for success, and by trying to maintain a collaborative, healthy vibe on set because you are all there making a movie together, the whole experience was the most difficult but satisfying thing attempted to date. For us, the goal now will just be respecting those lessons and trying to grow from it all as the next project gets set up.”

There’s one other person who really deserves mention here – cinematographer Mike Bove. Bove’s clean, CinemaScope-ish visuals, shot with an Alexa digital camera, really bring the film to life, and take full advantage of natural light and the sparse settings of the film, which was shot on location in Wisconsin, and briefly, in Chicago.

It seems that Piet and Crary had three different levels of budgeting to work with – the dream budget, the “B” level budget, and the bare bones budget, and what happened in the end is that they mostly used the “C” schedule, shooting only what they needed. And that’s good – it’s perfect the way it is.

This is a dazzling debut film - check out the trailer here.

Creative Tips from Legendary Directors

Friday, October 3rd, 2014

The website Film School Rejects has an excellent series of “tips” on the creative process in cinema.

Landon Palmer and Scott Beggs of the website Film School Rejects have assembled an excellent series of maxims and advice from key filmmakers around the world; everyone from David Lynch to Shirley Clarke to William Greaves to James Gunn to Jim Jarmusch to Alain Resnais to Abbas Kiarostami and all the stops inbetween, and archived it here – at this website. This is a really valuable resource not only for filmmakers, but also for those who want to understand the creative process in filmmaking, as outlined by the top practitioners, past and present, in the field. If there’s one theme running through all these condensed interviews, it’s to be true to yourself. As David Lynch put it, “there were very bad reviews [of Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me]. I was under a bad cloud during that time and it just didn’t go well. But I loved the film and when you do something you believe in and it doesn’t go well it’s okay. If you sell out like I did in Dune and it doesn’t go, well, then you really die.”

Lots of food for thought here; click here, or on the image above, to read more.

The Straight Story

Thursday, September 1st, 2011

The Straight Story is perhaps David Lynch’s most perfect film, shot by legendary DP Freddie Francis.

Freddie Francis, the two time Academy Award winning director of cinematography — for Sons and Lovers (1960) and Glory (1989) — was a dear friend of mine, and I’ve watched him at work on the set many times, from his film The Doctor and The Devils (1985) through Her Alibi (1989) and finally The Straight Story (1999), which was shot in 23 days in Iowa. A director as well as a director of cinematography, Freddie had two distinct careers, although in his directorial efforts, he was early on “typed” as a Gothic director, much to his dismay, and never really got the chance to do a non-genre film.

The Straight Story tells of Alvin Straight (Richard Farnsworth), who decides to make the long journey to visit his ailing brother Lyle (Harry Dean Stanton), but, being unable to drive a car because of his health, is forced to make the trip on a John Deere lawnmower, which takes him six weeks, until he finally arrives on Lyle’s doorstep in the film’s final sequence.

When the filming started, Freddie called me up and asked me if I wanted to come out and visit him; it was to be our last meeting. Since most of the film was shot in Iowa, it was an easy trip, and I set out to meet the crew on location. It was a smooth drive, and it was great to see Freddie and his wife, Pamela, one more time.

I was present during the last day of filming, and watched in awe as Freddie knocked out one set-up after another, usually getting it done in one take or two, racing against the end of the day, when Harry Dean Stanton as Lyle, in for one day of shooting only, would have his penultimate meeting with Alvin. The scene was ultimately shot in near darkness, but Freddie flooded the porch set with so much light that it matched the daytime sequences perfectly, and the film came in on time and under budget.

Freddie was in ill health for much of the shoot for The Straight Story due to a gallstone attack, but he nevertheless kept up his usual whirlwind pace on the set, organizing not only the main unit, but several second unit crews to do pickup and background shots to get the filming completed all that much faster. He was, as always, absolutely in control.

The Straight Story is a gorgeous, deeply life affirming film, and contains the great Richard Farnsworth’s last performance, as well as Freddie’s final work as a cinematographer. Shot entirely on location, and based on a true story, the film is easily David Lynch’s most humane and accessible film, a tribute to the spirit of human determination in the face of seemingly nearly insurmountable odds. Freddie and David had worked before on The Elephant Man (1980) and Dune (1984), but in this, their final collaboration, I think they created their finest work as a team.

If you haven’t seen The Straight Story, check it out as soon as you can.

About the Author

Wheeler Winston Dixon

Wheeler Winston Dixon, Ryan Professor of Film Studies at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, is an internationally recognized scholar and writer of film history, theory and criticism. He is the author of thirty books and more than 100 articles on film, and appears regularly in national media outlets discussing film and culture trends. Frame by Frame is a collection of his thoughts on a number of those topics. All comments by Dixon on this blog are his own opinions. To contact Prof. Dixon for an interview, reach him at or

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