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The One I Love: Another Film Lost in The Cosmos

Wednesday, December 10th, 2014

I have a new essay on Charlie McDowell’s film The One I Love in Film International.

As I note,The One I Love (2014) is yet another film that’s been completely overlooked in the headlong rush to the multiplex, yet it’s a stunning directorial debut by Charlie McDowell, from a script by Jonathan Lader, and produced by the Duplass Brothers, Mark and Jay (Charlie McDowell, incidentally, is actor Malcolm McDowell’s son with Mary Steenburgen). Mark Duplass does double duty – an apt turn of phrase, as you will see – starring in the film, in addition to his co-producer role, as harried husband Ethan, who is first seen in a therapy session, both angry and repentant after having cheated on his wife Sophie (Elizabeth Moss, best known for her work on the TV series Mad Men). More on that later.

Yet, for all the force and power that The One I Love possesses, it might as well not have been made at all, so quickly did it disappear. As Wikipedia notes, after a well received screening at the Sundance Film festival on January 21, 2014, ‘The One I Love opened in a limited release [on August 22, 2014] in the United States in 8 theaters and grossed $48,059 with an average of $6,007 per theater and ranking #42 at the box office. The film’s widest release was 82 theaters and it ended up earning $513,447 domestically and $69,817 internationally for a total of $583,264.’ And then it was gone.

That’s a shame, because The One I Love is both original and unsettling, even as it incorporates themes, either by design or simply through coincidence, from John Cromwell’s The Enchanted Cottage (1945), tinged with the much darker vision of Maury Dexter’s The Day Mars Invaded Earth (1963), with touches of Spike Jonze’s Being John Malkovich (1999) and Michel Gondry’s Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004) thrown in for added resonance.

The One I Love starts off in a seemingly predictable manner, as if the film will be another earnest study of a marriage in collapse, in the manner of Mike Nichols’ film of Edward Albee’s play Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966, which is actually referenced in the film’s dialogue), but soon any clinical realism is abandoned for a far more sinister and elliptical scenario – a kind of dark ‘magical realism’ – in which the audience is never sure about the characters’ motives, or even their putative identities.

Not surprisingly, Ethan and Sophie are experiencing a moment of crisis in their relationship as a result of Ethan’s infidelity, and their smooth and all-too-affable therapist (effortlessly played by Ted Danson) suggests that they spend a weekend at a therapeutic retreat to ‘reconnect.’ At first, when the couple arrives at the lavishly appointed estate, which is to be their home for the next few days, all seems well. It’s a rather odd place, overflowing with flowers and lavishly decorated throughout, with a guest book in the front hallway attesting to the salutary effect it has had on the previous couples who have stayed there.”

Click here, or on the image above, to read the complete essay.

Who on Earth Would Want To Work for Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce?

Monday, June 4th, 2012

Click here, or on the image above, for a video clip from Mad Men.

No one is denying that Mad Men is an excellent television show — I watch it faithfully, though not without apprehension given its increasingly downbeat plotlines — but who on earth would want to return to those times, or work at Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce? It’s not really an authentic vision of the ’60s anyway; take it from me — I was alive then, working at Life Magazine as a writer, and immersed in the whole ad/print culture of the era — but rather stresses the down side of everything, as though no one is having any fun at all.

Which they’re really not; Don Draper (Jon Hamm) seems tortured on all sides by regrets, conflicting loyalties, and his enigmatic past, while Peggy Olson (Elisabeth Moss) has recently departed the agency for greener fields (and who can blame her?), and poor Lane Pryce (Jared Harris) has just committed suicide over a forged check, for which Don fired him. Great! Just the sort of television one wants to relax with on a Sunday night, right before the start of the work week. As Don Draper explodes in a meeting with a prospective client, “you’re not happy! You’re not happy with anything!” And with the absolutely unprincipled Pete Campbell (Vincent Kartheiser) as a rising star in the agency, well, look out. Things are going to get even uglier, I have no doubt.

Still, I DVR it, watch it while zipping through the commercials, and think it’s far and away the best thing on television right now — there’s just one more episode this “season” as I write this, and then — apparently — only two seasons more after that. But with a definite end date in mind for the series, I can’t help but think that Elisabeth Moss is happy to escape her role as the much-put-upon Peggy for the lead in a Jane Campion miniseries, Top of the Lake. And we’ll be seeing Jared Harris as Ulysses S. Grant in Steven Spielberg’s biopic Lincoln; that footage is already in the can, as his death in Mad Men was shot last summer, but amazingly, everyone managed to keep quiet about it.

But the question remains; given the utterly hostile and desperate workplace of Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce so effectively depicted in each episode of the show, who on earth would want to work there?

About the Author

Wheeler Winston Dixon

Wheeler Winston Dixon, Ryan Professor of Film Studies at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, is an internationally recognized scholar and writer of film history, theory and criticism. He is the author of thirty books and more than 100 articles on film, and appears regularly in national media outlets discussing film and culture trends. Frame by Frame is a collection of his thoughts on a number of those topics. To contact Prof. Dixon for an interview, reach him at 402.472.6064 or wdixon1@unl.edu. Visit him at his website wheelerwinstondixon.com.

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