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Posts Tagged ‘Remakes’

Gareth Edwards’ Godzilla (2014)

Tuesday, February 25th, 2014

Four years ago, Gareth Edwards (that’s him above) made a small and very effective film, Monsters (2010).

That film cost practically nothing, and was shot on location in Mexico on a catch as catch can basis, picking up scenes along the way and then repropping them with low cost but very effective CGI enhancement, something that Edwards is really good at. At the time, Edwards said that with Monsters, he wanted to create a film that was a cross between War of The Worlds and Lost in Translation, and oddly enough, the film was just that; a thoughtful, low key monster film, in which the monsters were kept out of view for most of the movie, only to be revealed rather spectacularly at a gas station in the middle of the desert in the film’s final moments.

Now, he’s back, with something much more conventional; yet another reboot of Godzilla, based on the 1954 Ishiro Honda original. Actually, Godzilla – both the character, and the movie – could really use a reboot, for once, since it’s been the subject of so many subpar remakes and sequels, not to mention – let’s please don’t mention – the miserable Matthew Broderick remake a few years back. But here, Edwards seems to be taking a Christopher Nolan approach to the material, and the cast is first rate; Bryan Cranston, Ken Watanabe, David Strathairn and Juliette Binoche all are involved. So this may work.

Click here to view the trailer , which is full of destruction, but no monster until the very end. Check it out.

For more free articles and videos, visit my website at wheelerwinstondixon.com

Roger Corman to Remake Eight Poe Movies in 3-D

Thursday, December 20th, 2012

As Alex Ben Block writes in The Hollywood Reporter, Roger Corman, at 86, is still cranking them out.

As he notes, “Roger Corman [. . .] is making new versions of eight low-budget horror films based on stories by 19th century American writer Edgar Allan Poe that he adapted and directed in the 1960s. House of Usher will be followed by The Pit and the Pendulum, Premature Burial, Tales of Terror, The Raven, The Haunted Palace [actually based on H.P. Lovecraft's novella The Case of Charles Dexter Ward], The Masque of the Red Death and The Tomb of Ligeia.

This time, Corman will produce but not direct the films, with the first to shoot in 2013, followed by two a year after that on budgets of $2 million to $2.5 million (the originals were shot for $250,000 to $350,000, not adjusting for inflation, on 15-day schedules). Like [the original versions, made for American International Pictures], his New Horizons Productions will not pay for rights because the source material is in the public domain.

The new productions will be self-financed by Corman’s New Horizons Productions, which will give the films at least a short domestic theatrical release and offer international rights at the American Film Market. “Now being able to do them in 3D and with a lot of computer graphics, we can do things we never dreamed of doing before,” he says. But that won’t include more violence. “Poe always worked with the unconscious mind, and there’s a lot of fantasy,” he explains. It may include more erotic material, in keeping with Poe’s approach, but Corman says there will probably still be no nudity.

Corman, honored at the first Governors Awards in 2009, says his biggest concern is replacing his legendary leading man Vincent Price, who died in 1993. Corman hopes to find a fiftysomething actor known from TV who, he says, can bring the same level of ’sensitivity and neuroticism that Vincent was able to bring.’ Corman has Mike McClain, who wrote his last movie – The Haunted, a Chinese co-production shot in in that country — working on the Usher script. Already a living legend [. . .] why does Corman continue to work at his age? He replies with one of his typically to-the-point comments: ‘I simply love making motion pictures.’”

Actually, Corman has already produced a low-budget remake of The Masque of the Red Death in 1989, directed by Larry Brand, toplined by Patrick Macnee and Adrian Paul. While nowhere nearly as effective as Corman’s 1964 version, starring Vincent Price and Hazel Court, and immaculately photographed by the great Nicolas Roeg, it was still an interesting piece of work. But as Corman says, he simply can’t stop making movies. At the very least, the films will prove an excellent training ground for perhaps the very last group of Corman’s protégés, who will then go on to bigger and better projects. It’s a return to the past, but I wish he was doing something new.

Then again, as a pre-sold franchise, the new Poe films should do well in the marketplace.

About the Author

Wheeler Winston Dixon

Wheeler Winston Dixon, Ryan Professor of Film Studies at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, is an internationally recognized scholar and writer of film history, theory and criticism. He is the author of numerous books and more than 70 articles on film and appears regularly in national media outlets discussing film and culture trends. Frame by Frame is a collection of his thoughts on a number of those topics. To contact Prof. Dixon for an interview, reach him at 402.472.6064 or wdixon1@unl.edu.

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