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Posts Tagged ‘Television Commercials’

It Can Wait – No Post Is Worth A Life

Monday, August 31st, 2015

Here’s a really powerful commercial from AT&T on the dangers of texting and driving.

I don’t usually comment on commercials, but this one is really powerful – with a minimal voiceover from actor Forest Whitaker, “two cars collide in a horrific crash when one swerves into the other lane. The scene reverses and you see a mom posting an update while she drives. Just before she crashes, she looks back to tell her daughter everyone loves the picture she posted of her. AT&T wants you to know that looking at your phone can wait. No post is worth a life.”

Absolutely true – and a really compelling reminder not to text, or post, and drive.

Hollywood Goes Commercial – Really!

Wednesday, May 6th, 2015

As Alexandra Bruell and Maureen Morrison report in AdAge, more and more stars are doing commercials.

As they write, “the plot of Sofia Coppola’s 2003 film, Lost in Translation, follows a movie star played by Bill Murray as he films a commercial in Tokyo to avoid lowering his status in Hollywood. That ploy certainly wouldn’t work today — and it certainly wouldn’t be necessary.

Matthew McConaughey’s Oscar-winning turn in Dallas Buyers Club coincided with a series of TV commercials for Lincoln. Charlize Theron is the face of Dior. Brad Pitt hawked Chanel No. 5. Katy Perry pitched Proactiv acne treatment. And Kevin Spacey replaced a talking baby as the face of E-Trade. In other words, adland has the keys to Hollywood.

‘There’s no question the relationship between entertainment and advertising is grander and more important and deeper than it’s ever been,’ said David Droga, creative chairman at Droga5. Some shops are capitalizing on the trend by aggressively teaming up with more established entertainment powers: In the past few years, Deutsch has formed relationships with music labels such as Capitol Records; Edelman started a joint venture with United Talent Agency; and Droga5 sold a 49% stake to William Morris Endeavor.

Agencies know what brands want from stars. ‘They need agencies for our strategic thinking, for our link to brands and money, for our consumer understanding,’ said Mr. Droga, whose shop is working with Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson, a star of Furious 7, to build his own brand. Brands have also made it easier for celebrities to lend their star power by improving production values and telling more relevant stories. BMW Films, which starred celebrities including Madonna and Clive Owen in 2001 and 2002, led the way.”

In short, it’s a new day in Hollywood – click here, or on the image above, to read the whole article.

Federico Fellini’s Television Commercials

Saturday, January 12th, 2013

Yes, Federico Fellini directed television commercials — click here, or on the image above, to see them!

Just posted by the website Open Culture, here are a series of television commercials (!!) that the great Italian filmmaker Federico Fellini directed shortly before his death. Perhaps the most interesting one is for the Bank of Rome, in which Fernando Rey appears as a sympathetic psychiatrist. As the Open Culture website notes, “in 1991 Fellini made a series of three commercials for the Bank of Rome called Che Brutte Notti or The Bad Nights. ‘These commercials, aired the following year,’ writes Peter Bondanella in The Films of Federico Fellini, ‘are particularly interesting, since they find their inspiration in various dreams Fellini had sketched out in his dream notebooks during his career.’

In the commercial The Picnic Lunch Dream, the classic damsel-in-distress scenario is turned upside down when a man (played by Paolo Villaggio) finds himself trapped on the railroad tracks with a train bearing down on him while the beautiful woman he was dining with (Anna Falchi) climbs out of reach and taunts him. But it’s all a dream, which the man tells to his psychoanalyst (Fernando Rey). The analyst interprets the dream and assures the man that his nights will be restful if he puts his money in the Banco di Roma.”

Really worth watching; you can see Fellini’s masterful touch in every image.

About the Author

Wheeler Winston Dixon

Wheeler Winston Dixon, Ryan Professor of Film Studies at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, is an internationally recognized scholar and writer of film history, theory and criticism. He is the author of thirty books and more than 100 articles on film, and appears regularly in national media outlets discussing film and culture trends. Frame by Frame is a collection of his thoughts on a number of those topics. All comments by Dixon on this blog are his own opinions. To contact Prof. Dixon for an interview, reach him at wdixon1@unl.edu or wheelerwinstondixon.com

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