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My Videos on Vimeo – Full Speed

Saturday, July 1st, 2017

Here’s a brief abstract video I’ve made – nice and short – entitled Full Speed.

I have been making quite a number of videos, and posting them on Vimeo – free to view for all – and here’s one I made two years ago that seems particularly popular. I check my viewing stats on a relatively daily basis, and re-order the playlist in order of changing viewer preferences – not necessarily my own favorites, but the ones that get played and loaded the most. Actually, our tastes coincide most of the time, and I’m drawn, especially these days, to my lighter, more accessible work.

Full Speed is a brief abstract animation, nice and bright, to add some color and cheer to your day. You can see my front page on Vimeo by clicking here, which includes my latest works, just posted today – Dome and Flowers along with a batch of other popular videos, including Serial Metaphysics, DJ, Dana Can Deal, Numen Lumen, Beat Box, Real & Unreal, Life of Luxury, Escape and about 300 more videos from 1974 to the present. They cover a wide range of approaches, from documentary to abstract and nearly all the possible stops in-between. Most run about 5 minutes or so, with some longer works in the 20 to 30 minute range.

My films have been screened at The Maryland Institute College of Art, The Museum of Modern Art, The Whitney Museum of American Art, Anthology Film Archives, The Microscope Gallery, The British Film Institute, The Jewish Museum, The Millennium Film Workshop, The San Francisco Cinématheque, The New Arts Lab, The Collective for Living Cinema, The Kitchen Center for Experimental Art, The Filmmakers Cinématheque, Film Forum, The Amos Eno Gallery, Sla 307 Art Spacesee the video for that screening here –  The Gallery of Modern Art, The Oberhausen Film Festival and at numerous universities and film societies throughout the world.

Now’s your chance to see them – for free – whenever you wish.

New Video – Mystery Train

Wednesday, May 24th, 2017

Here’s a new video entitled Mystery Train. Click here, or on the image above, to view.

Wheeler Winston Dixon’s films have been screened at The Maryland Institute College of Art, The Museum of Modern Art, The Whitney Museum of American Art, Anthology Film Archives, The Microscope Gallery, The British Film Institute, The Jewish Museum, and The Millennium Film Workshop.

In addition, his works have been shown at The San Francisco Cinématheque, The New Arts Lab, The Collective for Living Cinema, The Kitchen Center for Experimental Art, The Filmmakers Cinématheque, Film Forum, The Amos Eno Gallery, Sla 307 Art Space, The Gallery of Modern Art, The Oberhausen Film Festival and at numerous universities and film societies throughout the world.

In 2003, Dixon was honored with a retrospective of his films at The Museum of Modern Art, and his films were acquired for the permanent collection of the Museum, in both print and original format. More recently, he has been working in HD video with such films as An American Dream, Instant Replay, and The Shapes of Things, and continues to create new work, with some two hundred plus videos to date available for viewing on his Vimeo website.

To see more of Dixon’s video and film work, just click here.

Recent Video: Time’s Up!

Saturday, February 18th, 2017

Recently, I have been making a number of recombinant videos; click here to see Time’s Up!

I’ve been making films and videos since 1966, and my work has been screened at The Museum of Modern Art, The Whitney Museum of American Art, Anthology Film Archives, The Microscope Gallery, The British Film Institute, The Jewish Museum, The Millennium Film Workshop, The San Francisco Cinématheque, The New Arts Lab, The Collective for Living Cinema, The Kitchen Center for Experimental Art, The Filmmakers Cinématheque, Film Forum, The Amos Eno Gallery, Sla 307 Art Space, The Gallery of Modern Art, The Oberhausen Film Festival and at numerous universities and film societies throughout the world.

In 2003, I was honored with a retrospective of my films at The Museum of Modern Art, and my films from 1966 to 1994 were acquired for the permanent collection of the Museum, in both print and original format. However, as film became ever more expensive in the 1980s and 1990s, I turned more towards writing and critical work, but suddenly, I was drawn again to making films. Now, with the advent of digital HD video, and the ease of video distribution on Vimeo, I’m working again, creating new films, with screenings in New York this past November, 2016, and more to come in the future.

As someone who is fascinated with pop culture, many of my films use footage and soundtracks that are in the public domain, or released under a creative commons license, and are made entirely from recycled, repurposed and refashioned images and sounds. Time’s Up! is a good example of the style of video production. The other interesting point for me is that I’m reaching more viewers through Vimeo than in all my museum screenings put together; as I observed to a friend of mine who is also a video and film artist, Vimeo is now the new “cinematheque” for experimental work.

When my film Serial Metaphysics was screened at The Whitney Museum of American Art, Bruce Rubin, then Associate Curator film and video programming for the museum, wrote in part that “Dixon is a masterful film editor. His sensitivity to the movement within the frame and of the camera itself allows for a fluidity in his editing that is exuberant and refreshing. He is skillful not only in manipulating the flow of images but the flow of ideas as well.” So take a look at this brief film – which runs about two minutes in all –

and then if the mood strikes you, click here to go to my Vimeo site.

New Video: Jacket

Saturday, February 4th, 2017

I have a new video in collaboration with artist Klaus Hausmann: click here, or above, to see it.

This is the sort of collaboration that could only happen in the digital era; Hausmann lives in Germany, and posted an 11 second version of this video on a video sharing website I sometimes visit. I expanded on the existing video, added the track, and voila – a collaboration that crosses borders, space and time with impunity.

As I wrote in the brief description for the video, “is it a jacket, or a straitjacket – it’s hard to tell.” Hausmann’s struggle to get the jacket on in the proper fashion – aided and sometimes thwarted by stop motion videography – is a metaphor for the knotty situations we sometimes find ourselves in, and triumph anyway.

If you like Jacket, check out some of my other videos by clicking here.

Gwendolyn Audrey Foster’s “Men and Machines” Series on Vimeo

Thursday, November 24th, 2016

Gwendolyn Audrey Foster has a new series of videos on the theme of “Men and Machines.”

“The meaning of things lies not in the things themselves, but in our attitude towards them. The machine does not isolate man from the great problems of nature but plunges him more deeply into them.” — Antoine de Saint-Exupery

“It is interesting to view Nature through the lens of construction ‘sight’ – after all – is Nature itself not the Mother of all construction sites? I wonder if we have always viewed the world as a potential building site? The binary between these coexistent worlds is not so easily defined. Are domesticated plants and meadows, for example, all that ‘natural’ — or are they not liminal hybrids; both ‘natural’ and ‘artificial?’ Are machines ‘natural’ or hybrid and liminal?

Modern experience of the environment is mediated through a mechanical duo-consciousness. I admire the often breathtaking beauty of ‘Nature’ as an ongoing organic ‘construction site’; but I am also in awe of human industry and construction – particularly our aural and visual resonances – waste and decay in tracings, relics, and ruins.

The ‘Men and Machines’ series invites meditation into the complex relationship between man, machine, and ‘Nature’ – the politics, philosophy and aesthetics of the sights and sounds of industry as they are mechanically mediated and manufactured by the camera eye and ear.” – Gwendolyn Audrey Foster

Videos in the “Men and Machines” series include:

Echo and Narcissus – vimeo.com/187504524

Construction Site – vimeo.com/188719797

Johnny’s Machines – vimeo.com/188380596

Machine – vimeo.com/190509450

Inside – vimeo.com/189477394

Col Bleu – vimeo.com/185865697

Mirror – vimeo.com/184270334

Not – vimeo.com/172252797

Waste – vimeo.com/165976297

Product – vimeo.com/179584124

Selfie – vimeo.com/178762302

Foster’s meditational videos are both moving and insightful – essential viewing.

Vimeo vs. Theatrical or, The 21st Century Cinematheque

Tuesday, October 18th, 2016

Vimeo is the 21st century version of the experimental cinematheques of the 1960s.

I’m old enough to remember the countless theatrical screenings I’ve attended in my life, both of mainstream and experimental films, and there’s still – after all these years – no substitute for seeing a film in a theater, properly projected on a big screen. But times change, and we change with them. Theatrical repertory houses have all but died off, projection on 35mm film is now a boutique item – sort of like watching an opera live – and the cost of making films in traditional media has skyrocketed.

I’ve had many screenings of my films over the years at museums and galleries, and I’m deeply grateful for the experience of having a live audience – there’s nothing like it – but we have to realize that much of this resides in the past. The future is online, and as David Bowie observed way back in 2002 with typical prescience, the world is going to streaming as the preferred form of access for books, movies and music, adding that “it’s terribly exciting. But on the other hand it doesn’t matter if you think it’s exciting or not; it’s what’s going to happen.”

So although I have two video shows coming up in New York, which I’m very excited about – at the SLA 307 Gallery and The Amos Eno Gallery, offering the chance to interact with a live audience – in many ways, the audience on Vimeo is just as real, and the videos are seen by a vastly larger number of viewers. Just yesterday, I received an invitation to participate in group exhibition in Bologna, Italy – by using Vimeo as part of a group installation – that I never would have had the chance to appear in, were it not for the global reach of Vimeo on the web.

YouTube has a much wider audience, of course, but the quality of the image, and the control that one has over the video files that one uploads, is vastly inferior to the degree of artistic and viewer control that one has on Vimeo. It’s the first high-definition video upload site, and although there is more and more that’s commercial on the site, by and large it’s a place for artists, which is as it should be. It gives all video and filmmakers a chance to reach out to the entire world. Thanks to Bill Domonkos for the gif above; he’s a superb artist, whom I met through Vimeo; much appreciated.

The image above is from my video Real & Unreal: click here, or on the image above, to access my Vimeo site.

Louis Augustine Aimé Le Prince – The First Filmmaker

Wednesday, September 14th, 2016

Here’s a new documentary out on Louis Augustine Aimé Le Prince – the very, very first filmmaker.

As the site for the film on Vimeo notes, during “October 1888 Louis Le Prince produced the world’s first films in Leeds, England. These were shot on cameras patented in both America and the UK. Once he had perfected his projection machine Le Prince arranged to demonstrate his discovery to the American public and thus the world.

On 16th September 1890, just days before he was due to sail to New York Louis Augustine Aimé Le Prince stepped onto the Dijon to Paris train and was never seen again. No body was ever found so legally no one could fight the Le Prince claim that he invented a camera that recorded the very first moving image.

As a result, several years later, Thomas Edison and the Lumiere Brothers were to claim to the glory and the prize of being acknowledged as the first people to pioneer film. Louis Le Prince was never added to history books. But for one lone voice, who worked with him, Le Prince’s name and his pioneering work was forgotten.

The First Film is David Nicholas Wilkinson’s decades long quest to prove to the world that a Frenchman Louis Le Prince made the first films in 1888 and that the birthplace of motion pictures was not America nor France but in fact the city of Leeds in the county of Yorkshire, England.”

Le Prince’s story has long been one of the great mysteries of the cinema, and the subject of a book and a documentary by Christopher Rawlence, The Missing Reel. However, in the ensuing years, a great deal of new material has come to light, and The First Film takes full advantage of these discoveries, to demonstrate convincingly – though many have argued this for years, myself among them – that Le Prince is the true pioneer of the motion picture medium.

This is a fascinating documentary of a tragically forgotten pioneer – absolutely essential viewing.

Wheeler Winston Dixon – New Films Posted on Vimeo

Sunday, July 31st, 2016

I have a number of new films posted on Vimeo, all in digital HD.

The titles include An American Dream, Real and UnrealStill Life, Light and ShadowCaptive AudienceClosed Circuit, The Shapes of Things, Summer Storm, CityLago di Garda and Acceleration and many more. You can check them all out by clicking on the image above, or the individual links for each title. I’ve been working on these films for the past couple of years, but all were released in 2016. They range in length from a half an hour to two minutes, and cover a number of different topics and approaches. They’re ”cinepoems” in the tradition of Man Ray, gathering widely disparate images together into an often conflicting, sometimes coherent whole.

An American Dream traces the rise of late-stage capitalism in the United States, and the decline of personal interaction. Money, violence, and consumerism dominate the images here, as befits a society in which 1% of the populace control 99% of the nation’s wealth, leaving the rest of us as mere spectators. In the final analysis, An American Dream is a requiem for a society in which inequality is the new norm.

Of An American Dream, critic Peter Monaghan noted that “the film’s theme is the rise of late-stage American capitalism, and the decline of personal interaction amidst increasing attachment to money, violence, and consumerism,” while David Finkelstein wrote that “watching An American Dream, hypnotized by the beautiful motion of slowly flying fragments of glass accompanied by heavenly voices, is like washing down several Valium pills with a martini, and musing on the state of American life as you drift off into a long, imperturbable sleep.”

Of the much more optimistic Still Life, critic Jorge Orduna wrote that “the world turns. The oceans give and take their power. The trees grow, the sun rises and sets, and we all go through it daily, and yet we don’t think about it. In this collection of images, you’re forced to think about it, even if it’s only for a brief time. For 30 minutes, you see both the stillness and motion of life. Watching the film without interruption, with headphones on, you feel as though you’re in your own cocoon, and by the end, you’ll have a new appreciation for the world around you.”

I have a show coming up this Fall at the Amos Eno Gallery in New York, but you can see the films now, right here on Vimeo. But they do look better on a large screen. So if you’ve got a video projector lying around the house, try one of the longer ones, like An American Dream, Real and UnrealStill Life, or The Shapes of Things, and see what you think. Those are perhaps my favorites of the group of films, and The Shapes of Things, especially, looks fabulous when projected in a theatrical setting. So get a blanket, some lawn chairs, and set it up in the backyard, or on the rooftop – after all, they’re free – something else I like about them.

Click on the various links or the image above, and have a look.

Bill Domonkos and The Archive of Dreams

Thursday, July 14th, 2016

A still from Domonkos’ Beyond The Blue Horizonclick here, or on the image above, to view this short video.

The video work of Bill Domonkos is at once mysterious and sublime, mixing 1940s and 50s pop culture with 21st century surrealism. As Michael Hardy notes in The Boston Globe, “Spooky. Hypnotic. Lush. Witty. Sublime. The extraordinary films of San Francisco-based artist Bill Domonkos call up a descriptive vocabulary that never seems to capture the fluidity, the aesthetic metamorphoses, of the director’s vision.” That’s a fitting enough description for starters, but what Domonkos does with found footage and editorial techniques is truly remarkable, creating an entirely new world in which the unreal is real, and the most extraordinary images and juxtapositions seem entirely natural.

Of his work, Domonkos himself notes, “I view my work as a collision and recombination of ideas. My process unfolds gradually and spontaneously—using found materials such as archive film footage, photographs, and the internet. I experiment by combining, altering, editing and reassembling using digital technology, special effects and animation to create a new kind of experience. I am interested in the poetics of time and space—to renew and transform materials, experiences and ideas. The extraordinary thing about cinema is its ability to suggest the ineffable—it is this elusive, dreamlike quality that informs my work.”

A regular figure on the gallery circuit, one can thankfully see a great of Domonkos’ work on Vimeo, by clicking here, although a certain amount of discretion is advised, as some of his work can be quite dark indeed. In general, I favor his lighter, more accessible work, gently playful in some instances, slightly sinister in others. Most of the videos are in the two to three minute range, and his works covers a wide ranges of themes and approaches.

My favorites are such videos as Sisyphus, in which a nondescript executive in a 1950s elevator is suddenly illuminated with a celestial light from above, as a mysterious rock descends through the elevator shaft to cover his face, intercut with an elderly workman clambering up and down the interior of the building, inspecting the elevator’s exterior with a flashlight. There’s no real reason for any of the images here, which is entirely the point; these things just happen in Domonkos’ world, and that’s all there is to it.

Another favorite is Dinah Soar, in which a young woman is first seen putting on makeup with the aid of a rather unusual machine, and then drives a sports car with a distinctly odd gearshift around a race track, only to be pursued by a group of racing car drivers, even as her face, at first possessed of the flawless beauty of a fashion model, gradually changes into a smoking death’s head, while mechanical wind up toys parade across the screen with childish abandon. Again, the precise meaning of these images, as well as the syntactical structure that unites them, is absolutely left up to the viewer; Domonkos creates a world in which anything is possible.

But I think that of all of Domonkos’ work, I’m drawn to those films in which the past and the present gently collide, such as Beyond The Blue Horizon. In this brief video, a 1940s Soundie (a short, pre-MTV music video) by The Three Suns is transformed into a jam session between a human space helmeted organist / vocalist, singing the title song, while two Martian (or alien) sidemen accompany him on guitar and accordion, all of which is being recorded by an unobtrusive sound man in the rear of the shot.

Domonkos’ skill is such that the entire scene seems oddly realistic, even down to the three-second “cigarette burn” cue in the upper right hand corner of the frame as the video comes to an end. All in all, it’s a very unusual world indeed, a recombinant vision that in which the past and present meld together to create a world that is at once accessible, but which operates entirely according to its own lights – a peek into a modern day Twilight Zone of found footage and digital mastery.

Bill Domonkos’ videos are unique, bizarre and deeply surreal – check them on out Vimeo.

Gwendolyn Audrey Foster’s New Film “Not” (2016)

Monday, July 4th, 2016

Gwendolyn Audrey Foster has a new film, entitled Not (2016).

As she writes of the film, “many billions of years compressed into five minutes – Not is an eco-horror cine-poem about human beings – a brief-lived, relentlessly self-destructive invasive species who once roamed the earth. Many people think apocalypse is something in the future – something out of a sci-fi film involving CGI and cataclysmic events, but ever since I read Silent Spring by Rachel Carson, I understood that environmental destruction of the earth is already happening – apocalypse is well underway.

Environmental apocalypse is often visually unspectacular or invisible. Aside from the visuals of icebergs melting into the sea – it’s often mundane and dull. It is catastrophic – but it can be as boring and mechanically repetitive as the industrial machines of destruction you see working away in this film. There is something weirdly beautiful, haunting, and even lyrical about such machines – they are rich visual metaphors for larger ‘machines’ such as capitalism, patriarchy, etc.

Apocalyptic environmental destruction may be dull and monotonous – but it is all around us, from fracking to mountain top mining – to hoarding and hyper consumption. It is right before our eyes, yet many people are seemingly blind to it. Many do not believe in global warming, yet they cling to some wildly irrational ideas about the supposed coming apocalypse. Irrationality goes hand in hand with apocalyptic thinking. What we ‘are’ seems less important than what we are ‘not,’ in a sense.

Not is a poem that is as much about toxic relationships between humans – as it is a contemplation of our relentless destruction of the earth. The inevitably damaging consequences of our empathy deficient species? The reckless & mechanized destructive nature of end stage capitalism? A siren call to alert us all that Thanatos is destroying Eros? A cry for empathy from the earth itself?  Not is offered as a thought-provoking metonymic poem. The meaning is left entirely up to the spectator. I let my subconscious take over on this one.”

You can view Not by clicking here, or on the image above, on Vimeo in HD.

About the Author

Headshot of Wheeler Winston Dixon Wheeler Winston Dixon, Ryan Professor of Film Studies at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, is an internationally recognized scholar and writer of film history, theory and criticism. He is the author of thirty books and more than 100 articles on film, and appears regularly in national media outlets discussing film and culture trends. Frame by Frame is a collection of his thoughts on a number of those topics. All comments by Dixon on this blog are his own opinions.

In The National News

Wheeler Winston Dixon has been quoted by Fast Company, The New Yorker, The New York Times, the BBC, CNN, The Christian Science Monitor, US News and World Report, The Boston Globe, Entertainment Weekly, The Los Angeles Times, NPR, The PBS Newshour, USA Today and other national media outlets on digital cinema, film and related topics - see the UNL newsroom at http://news.unl.edu/news-releases/1/ for more details.

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